First Images Technic Powered Up Hub

I’m in Billund today, taking part in the Fan Media Days. We have just had a presentation from the Powered Up team.

We have now seen the new technic hub unveiled, as well as two new motors designed to run with the platform.

The new Technic hub has 4 ports, as well as connectors around the border. Unlike the current Smart Hub used in LEGO City trains, it will be powered by AA Rather than AAA Batteries.

Continue reading

The Powered Up App Receives a Boost

I have not been so excited about seeing a software upgrade delivered as I have been this weekend. The LEGO Powered Up app has just been given a substantial bump up in its functionality.

Long time readers of the blog will know how I feel about LEGO Boost: a great set, and a simple way to automate any models that you might make. Since it was released 18 months ago, we have seen all sorts of creations, as well as ideas through the primary models in the set. But there are a few challenges: you need to work through the models to gain all functionality; and the hub itself is a little bulky for some applications, but certainly adds a lot of fun to some sets. In some ways, I see it as the natural successor to the early motor kits, used in the 60’s and 70’s to automate wheels models, and see them propelled under there own power. Unfortunately, despite sharing a plug system, it has not been compatible with other similarly plugged devices…until now.

Continue reading

Time to get moving: first steps into the Powered Up system [Review: Passenger Train 60197]

img_2285In which I finally get my hands onto some of the new Powered Up components and find myself dealing with a system full of immense potential. I compare the Powered Up system with the old Power Functions system for driving the train, draining the batteries in the process. And I start to wish for a little bit of magic…

Continue reading

Powered Up App: Puppy Preview

Over recent weeks, the LEGO® Powered Up App has become available, initially with programs for running both the  new Passenger train and Cargo Train Sets, and now also the Powered Up Batmobile.

IMG_2099

As well as controlling the speed of movement, there are also a number of sound effects associated with the app.  The sound effects are played through the phone/tablet speakers, rather than the powered up brick itself. While exploring the app at the breakfast table one morning, Mabel the Cavoodle hopped up to join us.  She was more engaged with the sounds made by the Batmobile App than the City Passenger Train App. Except for the one that sounds a little like our front door bell. Her responses were captured for your enjoyment.

I have a more comprehensive review of the passenger train coming up in the near future. In the mean time, don’t forget about our Antman and the Wasp MOC Competition, open until the 15th of August. Until next time,

Play Well!

Giving the Roller Coaster a Boost

Not satisfied with merely motorising my Roller Coaster 10261, I incorporate the Boost Robotics System, and then add some additional functionality. It’s all fun and games until the batteries stop running at full power…

IMG_0255There is no doubt that the new Roller Coaster 10261 is a magnificent model, worthy of a set piece in any LEGO Layout.  But driving it manually is a little tedious,to say nothing of the roughness of the ride. How can we make it so that we may have the coaster running, and share a drink with friends at the same time, while they marvel at this wonderful set?

Simple motoring using an ‘M’ motor.

Adding a Power Functions medium motor is simple: so simple in fact that you can work out how to do it in the pre release video: plug a motor over the drive shaft, and let it go.

And it goes on… and on… and on until you turn it off.  There is no break in the activity, the constant rumble of the motor.  Don’t get me wrong, this is pretty awesome, and with two trains of coaster carriages running, it can be pretty hypnotic. There is no reason that this should be any harder with the equivalent Powered Up/ PF2.0 motor, when we see it released in the future.

But I wonder if more can be done.

A Little Boost
In fact, adding simple automation to the set using the Boost Move hub, sensor and servo motor is pretty simple, and is described on the final page of the instructions. This is what it looks and sounds like.

Continue reading

More Powered Up News:

In which previously known unknowns become known knowns, and a previously unknown unknown is revealed.

A quick post, following on from recent PF2.0 posts.

Currently, Fan Media are meeting in Billund (I was unable to attend this year), and the new controller and battery box have been revealed in full. Information has been gathered from our friends at HispaBrick Magazine, as well as Sariel’s LEGO®️ Workshop.

Some Previously known unknowns have been revealed:

  • The battery box requires 6 “AAA” batteries, and measures 4×8 studs x 4 bricks high
  • The controller requires 4 batteries
  • The train motor looks like the old train motor, but with the new 6 strand wire as well as the PF2.0 connector.

A new feature on the remote has been revealed: the control switches can be rotated, so that it may trigger ‘left or right’ rather than forward/ back, as seen in this image of 2 controllers, courtesy of Lluís Gibert from HispaBrick Magazine (used with permission).

Sariel’s LEGO®️Worskshop has a nice video showing the new Powered Up components, which can be found here

As the train sets are due for release shortly, we should start getting some hands on news ‘real soon now’…

In the mean time, I am preparing to go to Japan Brickfest next week, and am excited to attend my first overseas Fan event, and meet some AFOLs from around the world! I expect there may be a post or two before then….

Until next time,

Play well!