Giving the Arctic Scout Truck a BOOST [60194/17101]

In which I struggle with the ideas of combining two sets into a completely seperate model, attempt to answer the riddle “What do you get if you combine a truck with a LEGO Robot?”, and find a sticker sheet that I really really like……

A couple of weeks ago, I brought you the first part of my look at the 2018 LEGO City Arctic Scout Truck. As a medium sized city set, I thought it was pretty nifty: a bit of landscape, a dog and polar bear, a few different figures and  cool (Ahem!) truck, with drive wheels and caterpillar tracks. How could it be improved on?

Now, some days I worry about the kind of LEGO builder I have become. The idea of taking a recently built set, and combining it with another set, featuring a similar colour palette caused me a little consternation. Both sets would now be potentially irreversibly combined. Or uncombined. I found myself lacking the necessary motivation to carefully seperate both sets at the end of the exercise. Perhaps this is a clear signal to continue the sorting exercise which I began last year, before getting a little… distracted. Again. Continue reading

Once Upon an Idea [Announcement 21315]

21315_Front_01Once Upon a Time, there were two LEGO® Fans who had an Idea.  

Grant had the Idea first, to make a pop-up book out of LEGO bricks.  Then he reached out to Jason, who had an Idea before.  They told their friends about the Idea, and those friends told their friends. Eventually, a Lot of People said that the Idea was good.

This meant that the Idea was taken to be read and reviewed by the wise people, who had to work out if the it could be made Real.  After much thought, it was announced to be so. The designers went to work: taking the Idea, and striving to produce a set that more than ten thousand people would want. Continue reading

Blizzard Exclusive Set: Omnic Bastion 75987

IMG_2931For the last few months, we have been teased with announcements of a forthcoming range of  LEGO® sets based on the video game Overwatch.  Last week, out of the blue, Blizzard, the publisher behind the game, announced immediate availability of the BlizzCon Exclusive ‘Omnic Skin Bastion75987’ set from their Gear Store.

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It’s a lovely model, but is that “Blizzard Exclusive” sticker worth the price? 

This was a bit unexpected, but offered some interesting opportunities as a retail experience.  The set is available more places than shop.lego.com can supply, and shipping is (by Australian standards) pretty reasonable.

Now, I don’t play Overwatch, but my son, a couple of weeks out from his final school exams has been quite a keen player, and was excited to see this new set. I ordered one shortly after it became available and then proceeded to wait. I did not have to wait long, however.

The set cost $USD25 plus approximately $USD10 for shipping to Melbourne (although adding extra sets only increased the shipping by 1-2 dollars per set – you may wish to purchase in conjunction with a friend or two and split the shipping). Having placed my order on October 12th, the parcel arrived via Federal Express on October 16th.  I don’t think I have ever received LEGO  from overseas quite so quickly. Continue reading

Tee-Ing off with Uniqlo [Rapid Review, Uniqlo LEGO®️ T-shirts]

Just as spring was getting underway, I was excited to see Japanese clothing manufacturer Uniqlo release a new range of licensed LEGO®️ themed T-shirts this year. In keeping with the 40th birthday of the Minifigure and 60th Anniversary of the LEGO Brick, the shirts have some appropriately historical themes.

I purchased two online for $AUD19.95 each, and they were delivered within a few days. I ordered one with a Classic Space logo on the front, and another with the current LEGO logo on the front. When I unwrapped them I had a pleasant surprise, discovering that there is additional printing on the back.

Now, retailers often use young, good looking models to demonstrate their wares. Uniqlo yet their garments model themselves on the website. The sun was shining today, so in the interests of demonstrating the look on an older, overweight subject, I have agreed to take one for the team. (Photos by Tash Jones)

The I’m wearing XL, and find them not too tight a fit on my body – I prefer a loose t-shirt to a close fitting one. The cotton material is soft, and not flimsy. They both have a pocket sewn over the left breast. Now I have something new to wear to Fan events, LUG Meetings or when I’m just seeking inspiration for writing a blog post!

While more expensive than plain, unlicenced shirts I feel they offered reasonable value, and I have always found the quality of Uniqlo garments to be pretty good.

I apologise for the quality of the model, but what do you think of the shirts? You can find the LEGO branded garments in store, or online at Uniqlo’s website.

Do you like to wear your favorite brand on your clothing? What’s your favorite shirt in this range?

Why not comment below, and sign up for notifications of new posts. Until next time…

Play well.

Things are Pretty Cool in LEGO® City

IMG_2816In recent years, the LEGO® City sets released in June have featured an adventuring/exploration theme. The folks from the City have been Exploring the Deep Sea (2015); Volcanos (2016) and the Jungle (2017).  After a stand-alone Arctic theme in 2000, and a successful excursion from the City in 2014, we return, once again, to the polar regions.

I have found myself picking up a couple of sets in this theme, but would like to focus on one particular set: 60194 – the Polar Exploration Truck. As the other minifigures and vehicles might creep into photographs today, I’ll disclose the presence of the 60190 Arctic Ice Glider(RRP $AUD9.99) and 60191 Arctic Exploration Team (RRP $AUD15.99) floating around in the build space as I took some pictures.

There are a few things that I find myself immediately warming to with this year’s Arctic sets: Continue reading

LEGO Creative Lab joins with Indiegogo to test drive new product line.

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Add A Splash of Creativity to your day.

Today, we see the announcement of an exciting collaboration between the LEGO Creative Play Lab and Indiegogo. Rather than just testing ideas out with employees and focus groups, LEGO have announced that some ideas will be developed through public crowdfunding platforms such as Indiegogo.

GearsThe first range to be developed in this way is the new FORMA series: Based around a Technic core, this range will feature subjects from nature with swappable skins, that can be colored in or changed by the purchaser. Aimed at a young adult market, there is an emphasis on the creative project for display, rather than being a toy. The initial Indiegogo features an articulated fish model, with four different skins/designs available.Model Close Up_move

As you can see, the final result is not a typical LEGO model, but resembles a lego skeleton with literal skins, which can be changed. The sets are priced from $45USD, and $15 for the additional skins.  The opening range includes a Koi, Splash Koi, shark and Ink Koi – to be coloured in by the purchaser!Product_4 skins

You can follow the link to the campaign here.  Currently only available in the UK and USA, in the future there is the possibility of engaging other markets.

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The completed koi model in action. Source: indiegogo.com

Continue reading

Creator Expert Vestas Wind Turbine Re-released and Sustainability Update [Announcement/Preview]

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In which we get a glimpse of another set re-released after 10 years and have a quick review of some of the recent steps the LEGO Group are taking towards a sustainable future.4999-1

Ten years ago, LEGO® set 4999 was released. A limited release set produced for Vestas®, a company which produces a significant number of wind turbines around the world,  this set was never made available to the general public.  Measuring over two feet high, it does have significant gravitas as a display piece.

Today, at the New York Climate Week,  the LEGO Group has announced the re-release of this set, as 10268 Vestas Wind Turbine. This time, the set will be available to the general public, from Black Friday (November 23). With 826 elements, the count is a little higher than the 803 listed for the older set in the database maintained by Brickset. In Australia, it will cost $AUD329. A full international price list is listed at the bottom of this post.

The Vestas Wind Turbine also includes a Power Functions Battery box, M motor, with a long extension cable, to get the turbine spinning, as well as lights.

Consisting of the wind turbine sitting on a small hill, with a house, service van and three minifigures, this set maintains many of the characteristics of the original.  Most of the elements in that set were readily available, except for one.  A green ‘Large ugly rock piece.’ While these could easily be substituted for one in grey, the green one has gone back into production for this set. The trees in this set are some of the first ‘Plants from Plants’ available for purchase in LEGO sets.  Earlier in the year, a promotional set was available, as a gift with purchase, in some markets.

Continue reading