Transeo Marilynosa![ Rebuilding the 31201 LEGO® Art Hogwarts Crests as Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe]

A couple of months ago, I put together the 31201 LEGO Art Harry Potter Hogwarts Crests (HPHC) mosaic, and I felt a little underwhelmed. But I think this was more a ‘me thing’ rather than an issue with the set: I personally didn’t feel a strong affinity with the source material, not really identifying with any particular Hogwarts House. I have heard from plenty of people who really enjoy the build, and want to build the set of crests, as well as the larger combination crest. So, as I said, it’s a Me thing. Perhaps I should have looked at a crest other than Hufflepuff’s?

That said, one positive point that I do appreciate is a large number of left over parts.

Of course, one of the stated goals for the LEGO ART range is not just to produce a mosaic which you could hang on your wall, but to also give adults an activity to focus on. You don’t need to hang your final result. you can dismantle it, and rebuild it as one of the other options, or even rebuild it as another image.

Despite personally feeling a little deflated by the HPHC building experience, I find the idea of building a LEGO Mosaic/Art set appealing. If you have followed my posts around the time of the range being announced, you will have seen my analysis of the value for money building the LEGO Art Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe, either through the set or purchasing the individual elements (Spoiler – they sets are good value for the elements you receive).

I’ll have to admit, the notion of a mass marketed LEGO Set based on the mass produced screen print of Marilyn Monroe amuses me as a further extension of the pop-art movement. So, I thought I would set out to investigate whether I could rebuild the Hogwarts Crest as Marilyn. Therefore using a mass produced LEGO Artwork to produce a different mass produced artwork. Now, along with virtually all Building instructions, you can download them from the LEGO customer support website, OR you can access them from Building Instructions App.

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Hogwarts Moments: Fitting in Furniture and Figures

Since the LEGO Group sent over some pre-release copies for me to review, I have spenty a little bit of time looking at LEGO® Harry Potter Hogwarts™ Moments Sets. These four sets each encompass activities in a single Hogwarts classroom, and come with an interesting collection of fittings and Furniture for the different classrooms. They also come with one teacher, as well as a couple of students. And if that’s not enough, they all get bundled up into book form! Last time, we reviewed the built in scenery, some of which could be great for your own Hogwarts MOC. Today, I would like to look at the individual items of furniture, as well as any interesting accessories, as well as the minifigures.

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LEGO Harry Potter: Hogwarts Moments – Setting the Stage

Earlier in the week, I previewed the Hogwarts Moment sets: playsets, each depicting a class from the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Today, I would like to take a look at the artwork included in the sticker sheets, as well as the fixtures within these neat little sets.

Today, we are looking at the internal artwork, as well as the fittings. Next time we will take a look at the furniture and the figures.

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LEGO® Harry Potter™ Hogwarts Moments: Overview

Amongst the sets forthcoming in 2021 are the Harry Potter Hogwarts Moments. These four sets each tuck away into a brick built book and are based on seminal scenes at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry: Transfiguration Class, Potions Class, Herbology Class and Charms Class.

Each set comes with a book case, with requisite scenery; additional furniture builds, and finally three mini figures: a teacher and two students.  Rather than focus on each of these sets individually at first, I will look at each of these aspects of the sets over several articles.

Ultimately, they all provide locations unseen at minifigure scale in the ‘2018 relaunch’ of Harry Potter range. In this article, we shall have a quick précise of each set, you can see the elements all knolled out together. The sets are priced at $USD29.99/ $AUD39.99.

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But is it Art? [31201 LEGO Art Harry Potter Hogwarts Crests Review]

The LEGO Art range was unveiled earlier this year with a range of varied works to go on the wall: Andy Warhol’s Marilyn, The Beatles, Iron Man, and your choice of Sith Lords. We have recently seen the latest sets in the range unveiled: Disney Mickey and/or Minnie and Hogwarts Crests. The LEGO group sent me a copy of the hogwarts crests to look at. Given the fact that I was yet to tackle any sets in this series, I was curious for the experience.

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The Magical Worlds of LEGO® and Harry Potter come together in Diagon Alley

It has been almost 10 years since we last saw a LEGO Set bringing forth the action from Diagon Alley, the hidden lane in London where every witch and wizard goes shopping in search of the Things They Need to get through that magical life of theirs.

With 14 Minifigures and 5544 pieces, 75978 Diagon Alley Features Ollivander’s, Flourish& Blott’s Book Shop, Florean Fortescue’s Ice Cream Parlor, Scibbulus, Quality Quiddich supplies, the offices of the Daily Prophet and Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes. While some of these appeared in last year’s microscale version of the street, this is the first time that most of these shops have been represented at minifigure scale. The set goes on sale on September 1 2020, and will cost £369.99 / $USD399.99 / 399.99EUR /$AUD599.99

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The Magic Continues to Build: 2020 Wizarding World Sets Announced. Available for preorder April 30

Over the last few years, we have come to expect to see new Harry Potter sets appearing around the middle of the year. In 2018, we saw sets released for The Philosopher’s Stone and The Chamber of Secrets. In 2019 we saw sets pertaining to The Prisoner of Azkaban as well as The Goblet of Fire. You might almost think that a pattern was appearing. So you might not be surprised to learn that, this year, we have some sets relating to The Order of the Phoenix, as well as the Half Blood Prince.

We have some locations that we have not seen before, as well as a a few being revisited after an absence of many years. The sets will be released inJune, around much of the world, and August in the USA.

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Expecto Patronum: Review on the Road (75945)

In which I pick up a set that hasn’t quite been released from LEGOLAND Germany, admire a Patronus and see a new way to build a tree. And Sirius Black returns after 15 years!

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Harry Potter and the Minifigure Innovations

With new Harry Potter LEGO Sets and Collectable Minifigures occupying the Zeitgeist, I look back on ways in which our minifigures have been innovated through their use in this theme over the years.title

When we recently looked at the new Harry Potter Collectable Minifigures, we had a look at the new leg elements – the ‘miniskirt’ and mid length legs. These new elements are a great inclusion during this, the fortieth anniversary of LEGO Minifigures.  I found myself wondering ‘What other innovations in figure design have we first seen in Harry Potter?’  We have seen so many different characters and creatures since the series first appeared in 2001: house elf, giants, goblins and trolls, as well as humans. To adequately depict these characters as minifigures form, a number of modifications to the standard form were introduced. Some of these we now take for granted.

The First (Second and Third) Double Sided Head Print

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Harry Potter and the Order of the Figures

 

Harry Potter Minifigures are out in the wild. Once again, new legs are released in the Harry Potter theme.  Here are some scattered thoughts and pictures. 

When I first heard about the Harry Potter Collectable Minifigures, I was not feeling too excited. We had already been delivered the second series of The LEGO Batman Movie collectable minifigures, as well as the brilliant series 18 – celebrating the 40th anniversary of the arrival of the LEGO Minigfigure. I really loved that set, but my taste for it was somewhat soured by the presence of the chase figure: the Policeman.  While I loved the idea of this reimagining of the 1978 classic ( I mean, there were no stickers!), the presence of only one figure in a box pushed up the price on the secondary market. The fact that the ‘chase’ figure could be found in the same place in every box meant they were rapidly identifiable by enthusiastic collectors, and people looking to flip them on the secondary market.

Now the inclusion of chase figures in collectable minifigures is not new – There was Mister Gold, back in series 10: but that was SO rare that most people considered it a special surprise, rather than an integral part of the set.  Having a rare figure in every box makes it feel like a necessary part of the set. Especially when the package insert lists it as an integral part of the set. So I let the Policeman pass.  I purchased an ‘incomplete set’, and occasionally had a look at the well rummaged boxes that I came across on random. Around two months after its release, a friend gave me a call as asked if I was still interested? He had come across a couple of extra policemen in his travels, and we organised a simple trade.

IMG_9980And now we have the 71022 Harry Potter Collectable Minifigures Series.  With twenty two figures, it is the largest collection of minifigures to date. Early rumours suggested that there would be twenty four characters, and this is indeed the case, as we discover that two figures in fact have dual identities.  We have sixteen figures related to the Harry Potter Series, some represented for the first time; and six from Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them.

IMG_9986There are also a number of special features introduced in this series:

Forty years of minifigures continues: Changes a foot.

As we have already considered this year,  we are now celebrating the fortieth anniversary of the arrival of LEGO Minifigures. In this series, we see the continuing development of minifigures with the arrival of a brand new minifigure element: the mid-height legs. One plate shorter than the standard minifigure legs, these are perfect for ‘not quite adult teens’, they are seen with seven of the twenty two figures present.  Initially I was concerned that these elements were isolated to a licensed, collectable minifigure series. However, this is not the first time that Harry Potter has been used to introduce new minifigure leg elements…The mini leg (design ID 41879), frequently used for children, Ewoks, Yoda and dwarves, was first introduced in 2002, as part of Gringotts Bank 4714, and Dobby’s release 4731, in tan, black and brown. These legs also featured in Star Wars, and train sets in the first year. Now, they are everywhere.

It is a shame that four of the seven figures that use the mid length legs have the markings associated with the gowns and uniform of Gryffindor students, and have limited reuse potential.  Fortunately, three figures have plain leg markings: Cho Chan and Neville Longbottom both have black legs, while Luna Lovegood has blue legs.

Here are the legs of all sizes in action:

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The other change that we have seen this year in in the use of the a new 2x2x1 2/3  curved slope (Miniskirt No.6 39139) : In this series of minifigures, we have three different colours and prints of the new part. It has also recently arrived in the Star Wars theme, worn by the Pretorian guards in 75216  Snoke’s Throne Room (Another August 2018 release). This element now means that figures wearing gowns or dresses are the same height as regular minifigures. Of interest, it is slightly tapered across the studs, and is slightly narrower than the bottom of the minifigure torso.  This has been the case with legs for years, but a point of difference with skirt wearing minifigures”

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Otherwise, what does the series have to offer?

22 minifigures, 24 characters, 27 faces,7 sets of the new ‘teen legs’, wands in 6 colours, 5 items of food, 2 suitcases ,5 animal familiars and a mandragora plant, dark green broom and a Golden Snitch!

So Much Pottery Goodness! Let’s cut to the chase and look at the Figures. Continue reading