The AFOL’s Guide to Overwatch #6: Watchpoint Gibraltar 75975

In which I reach the end of my survey of the (first wave of?) LEGO® Overwatch sets, find a gigantic gorilla in an armoured space suit, build a shuttle and gantry, discover an interesting property of some dark red elements and return to the ancient history of the LEGO Group as I ask the question “Why does the colour seem a bit off here?” Do you want to know more? Read on.

Let me tell you a story. When I began reviewing the Overwatch sets, I knew nothing of the game, and nothing of the lore. I still know virtually nothing about playing the game, BUT I have come to meet a number of the characters along the way, and appreciate the Lore behind them all. We have seen a number of sets so far: Tracer vs Widowmaker 75070 ; Hanzo vs Genji 75071; Dorado Showdown 75972; Rheinhart and D.va 75973 and most recently Bastion 75974. There is one set left to review: 75975: Watchpoint Gibraltar. This is the largest of the Overwatch sets, featuring a large shuttle launch vehicle, a rocket gantry/launch pad three minifigures and an oversized Gorilla wearing reading glasses.

I asked Harry, the game playing teenager in our house to explain why all these things would want to be put together in a single set, and why we should care?

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Lets’ Stream to the Rex-Treme [Rapid Review: Rex’s Rex-Treme Offroader 70826]

In which I perform another livestream build and review, build a buggy and am offered a challenge by the Bricktastic Blog. What could possibly go wrong?

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Living in a Dream (house) [Rapid Review 70831 Emmet’s Dream House/Rescue Rocket]

Let me tell you a story. I love living where I do. Most of the time. One of the not so great things about living in Australia is the fact that for three out of the four LEGO® [option theme name here] Movies (The LEGO Movie, the LEGO Batman Movie and The LEGO Movie 2), the official release date in Australia is roughly six weeks behind the rest of the world. Ninjago may have arrived almost simultaneously here. I don’t know what we did to deserve that! There have been a couple of preview screenings, but next to no effort was made by the distributers to publicise them.

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Feeling Forty and Fabulous in Fabuland [Review 341/132 Catherine Cat’s House and Morty Mouse]

Let me tell you a story.

This year, amongst other things, we celebrate forty years since the release of the first wave of Fabuland sets. Directed towards children making the transition from DUPLO® to regular system bricks, Fabuland represented the company’s first foray into story telling, and multimedia marketing.

Fabuland started simply in the form of sets: a town, with anthropomorphic animal headed figures, living their lives together. We had the essential services represented: police, fire and hospital, and ice cream. In time it expanded to include school, cafe, local government, transportation and paparazzi.

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Looking at The LEGO Movie 2 Collectable Minifigures in a New Light [UV Review 71023]

By now, for many this will be old news: the new set of collectable minifigures is now in shops: Twenty figures in the series. Sixty figures per box. Three complete Sets per box. NO Chase figures. No-one hard to find. But perhaps some are more desirable than others if you are just looking for one or two.

Most of the time, there appears to be one complete set per row BUT this has not been entirely consistent: perhaps some settling in transit, perhaps they just get mixed up a little in the factory?

Today, I’ll have a quick run-through of the figures, and point out some of the interesting features. I figure by now, most enthusiasts have already seen the figures, possibly even collected a set or two. So, I would like to bring you a pictorial essay. Highlighting the front and back of the figures, and also look at them under an ultraviolet lamp, to see if we see anything interesting…After looking at Vibrant Coral ever so briefly last week, I wonder how they will all appear now?

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Countdown to the Year of the Pig: Dragon Dance 80102 [Review]

As we approach the eve of the Year of the Pig, I would like to look at another of the sets released for the Chinese ‘Spring Festival’

The 80102 Dragon Dance has been enthusiastically awaited after the initial images arrived last November, and the set has been hotly sought after, in part due to its relative scarcity outside of Asia. In Melbourne, both this set and 80101 Chinese New Year Family Dinner have literally flown off the shelves, with long queues, household limits and disappointed customers being frequent occurrences at the LEGOLAND Discovery Centre store.

I can see the appeal of this set on many levels: as a seasonal set, it is one of the first sets released, outside of the ‘Year of the…..’ series, for this significant day in the Asian Cultural Calendar, touching on subject matter rarely covered previously, featuring bright colours, and a movement function, coupled with limited global distribution to the Asia Pacific Region – this set has very little to be negative about.

This set has 622 parts, and costs $AUD79.99 new. The retail channels for this set have been limited in Australia. Certainly, demand for this set has been high in the rest of the world, and it will be interesting to see what approach might be taken with this type of set in the future.

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Countdown to the Year of the Pig: Brickheadz Dragon Dance Guy [review]

With the Lunar New Year just around the corner, I though I might take a look at the Dragon Dance Guy, the first Brickheadz character to be released for this particular seasonal event. The dragon dance is a frequently performed at Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival, traditionally to celebrate a successful Harvest. The dragon is thought to bring prosperity and good luck. It is also believed that the dance will scare away evil spirits.

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