Flagship Certified Store to open in Sydney in late March

Yesterday, pictures started to surface of a vinyl wrapped store featuring lots of LEGO livery, at the Westfield Centre in Bondi Junction.

Today, we can confirm that we will see a LEGO® Certified Store open on that site in late March – probably in time to coincide with the (delayed, compared to the rest of the world) Australian opening of The LEGO Movie 2.

Image courtesy of David Scalone, used with permission.

While the Sydney’s first LEGO Centre at Birkenhead Point has long closed, the new shop – a Certified Store rather than LEGO Brand Retail – will operate over two floors, with a total floor space of 302sqm.

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The Second Wave of TLM2 sets announced…[preview, potential spoilers]

Ahead of this weekend’s New York Show, the LEGO Group have announced three more sets based on the LEGO® Movie 2, which opened in the rest of the world last weekend. The three new sets announced will be released in May. Some might consider some of the following content to be spoilers… as much as any set can be in the absence of context. Others won’t. Details of the sets, as well as the press release come after the break. Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

While I’m here: In Australia, while there were some preview screenings of The LEGO Movie 2 during the world wide opening weekend, we have to wait until March 21st to see the film’s general release here. How can we pass the time? How about some live building of some TLM2 sets. I’ll post details on the Rambling Brick Facebook and Instagram pages when I have a schedule worked out. Stay tuned for further details.

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Duplo 50: Taking the Lead with Characters.

This year, we are celebrating the 50th Anniversary of LEGO DUPLO. Basic brick sets first appeared in 1969, but figures were not introduced until 1977. They provided a way to introduce role play into the way that children interacted with DUPLO bricks. These first figures appeared ahead of minifigures, and there were then several ways in which DUPLO figures have led the way with regard to character design compared with minifigures. In this article, I will cover the changes in shape of the basic shape of figures seen in DUPLO sets since they were first introduced. I will not cover the introduction of each colour or hair/helmet mold, but I will cover the important changes that occurred in body design, as well as touch on some of the licensed figures that have appeared over the years…but only some!

1977

While DUPLO debuted in 1969, the first Duplo figures did not appear until 1977, a year ahead of minifigures. These figures were simple, finger puppet style figures, which would fit comfortably over 2×2 DUPLO Studs. With no moving ares or legs, they were similar in some respects to the ‘stage extra’ figures in use in the regular system sets at the time.

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Sydney Brick Show 2019: Last call to exhibit.

Sorry for the late notice ( and the irrelevance, if it’s not in your part of the world)…I’ve just heard that there is just a day or so left to get your applications in order to exhibit at the Sydney Brick Show. The Sydney Brick Show is on 6th-7th April 2019, at the Penrith Panthers Pavillion

If you haven’t got your applications in, NOW is the time to do it. You can find the application form here. Applications close 5pm 8th February.

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Looking at The LEGO Movie 2 Collectable Minifigures in a New Light [UV Review 71023]

By now, for many this will be old news: the new set of collectable minifigures is now in shops: Twenty figures in the series. Sixty figures per box. Three complete Sets per box. NO Chase figures. No-one hard to find. But perhaps some are more desirable than others if you are just looking for one or two.

Most of the time, there appears to be one complete set per row BUT this has not been entirely consistent: perhaps some settling in transit, perhaps they just get mixed up a little in the factory?

Today, I’ll have a quick run-through of the figures, and point out some of the interesting features. I figure by now, most enthusiasts have already seen the figures, possibly even collected a set or two. So, I would like to bring you a pictorial essay. Highlighting the front and back of the figures, and also look at them under an ultraviolet lamp, to see if we see anything interesting…After looking at Vibrant Coral ever so briefly last week, I wonder how they will all appear now?

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Countdown to the Year of the Pig: Dragon Dance 80102 [Review]

As we approach the eve of the Year of the Pig, I would like to look at another of the sets released for the Chinese ‘Spring Festival’

The 80102 Dragon Dance has been enthusiastically awaited after the initial images arrived last November, and the set has been hotly sought after, in part due to its relative scarcity outside of Asia. In Melbourne, both this set and 80101 Chinese New Year Family Dinner have literally flown off the shelves, with long queues, household limits and disappointed customers being frequent occurrences at the LEGOLAND Discovery Centre store.

I can see the appeal of this set on many levels: as a seasonal set, it is one of the first sets released, outside of the ‘Year of the…..’ series, for this significant day in the Asian Cultural Calendar, touching on subject matter rarely covered previously, featuring bright colours, and a movement function, coupled with limited global distribution to the Asia Pacific Region – this set has very little to be negative about.

This set has 622 parts, and costs $AUD79.99 new. The retail channels for this set have been limited in Australia. Certainly, demand for this set has been high in the rest of the world, and it will be interesting to see what approach might be taken with this type of set in the future.

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Vibrant Coral

I have been assembling 80102 Dragon Dance- a beautiful set introduced as an Asia Pacific Exclusive to celebrate the Spring Festival, or Lunar New Year. In this set I finally got to see a round 2×2 tile in the new colour, Vibrant Coral. Introduced with many different elements in the LEGO® Movie 2 set 70828 Pop Up Party Bus, this colour has been described by some as ‘just so neon’ or a little unusual and difficult to photograph.

Googling ‘Vibrant Coral,’ I learned that many corals gain their vibrant colours from zooxanthellae algae. The single celled algae derive their nutrients by using photosynthesis, and the coral provide shelter to the algae in return for some of the nutrients. Death of these algae occur during ‘coral bleaching’ events. Some of these algae produce greater levels of pigments in response to sunlight, and some also demonstrate fluorescence: glowing under ultraviolet light. I am pretty sure, however, that there are no algae growing on my mint from box LEGO Elements.

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