Giving the Roller Coaster a Boost

Not satisfied with merely motorising my Roller Coaster 10261, I incorporate the Boost Robotics System, and then add some additional functionality. It’s all fun and games until the batteries stop running at full power…

IMG_0255There is no doubt that the new Roller Coaster 10261 is a magnificent model, worthy of a set piece in any LEGO Layout.  But driving it manually is a little tedious,to say nothing of the roughness of the ride. How can we make it so that we may have the coaster running, and share a drink with friends at the same time, while they marvel at this wonderful set?

Simple motoring using an ‘M’ motor.

Adding a Power Functions medium motor is simple: so simple in fact that you can work out how to do it in the pre release video: plug a motor over the drive shaft, and let it go.

And it goes on… and on… and on until you turn it off.  There is no break in the activity, the constant rumble of the motor.  Don’t get me wrong, this is pretty awesome, and with two trains of coaster carriages running, it can be pretty hypnotic. There is no reason that this should be any harder with the equivalent Powered Up/ PF2.0 motor, when we see it released in the future.

But I wonder if more can be done.

A Little Boost
In fact, adding simple automation to the set using the Boost Move hub, sensor and servo motor is pretty simple, and is described on the final page of the instructions. This is what it looks and sounds like.

Continue reading

Going to Great Heights to Build: Cute Pug 30542

In which I find a local source of LEGO poly bag sets, select one and construct it mid flight, before returning my tray table to the upright position.

I’m on a journey. I am currently travelling to Japan to attend Kobe BrickFest.

I left home early this morning and have a couple of connecting flights, with the main leg between Brisbane and Tokyo taking around eight hours. And around that there are a couple of connecting flights.

One of the neat things about travelling to Japan compared to Europe is that the time difference is only one hour in the past. However, as such I should probably aim to keep my body clock on track. So inbetween the LEGO Ninjago Movie and other inflight entertainment, I thought I’d put together a little LEGO set. Continue reading

Australia/ New Zealand Only: A chance to win a limited Jurassic World Set

In recent weeks, news has come to light of a previously unannounced Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom set, featuring an Orange T-Rex.Today I received this news from LEGO Australia:

From June 12th – July 12th 2018, you can WIN a Limited Edition Rare T.Rex Survival Set valued at $70, simply by purchasing any LEGO®️ product from the participating retailers and completing an entry form. The exciting part is that there are less than 500 sets available globally! Toyworld AU will be giving away 8 sets, Toyworld NZ will be giving away 5 and both the LEGOLAND Discovery Centre and LEGO Certified Store are offering 3 – meaning it truly is a limited, once in a lifetime offer.

With another, ultra rare dinosaur for collectors, this limited opportunity is bound to get a bit of attention.

What do you think? A cool set?

Great color for a T. rex?

Leave your thoughts below. In the mean time,

Play Well

Bugatti Chiron 42083 Officially Revealed

REVEALED: THE NEW LEGO® TECHNIC BUGATTI CHIRON

Where art, engineering and bricks combine

Billund, 1st of June 2018. LEGO Group and Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S. have today revealed the new LEGO® Technic Bugatti Chiron. The 1:8 scale super car will be available from June 1.

The LEGO® Technic Bugatti Chiron model brings together the iconic design heritage of the French ultra-luxury car brand and LEGO Technic elements, with a reimagined version of the latest cutting-edge super car from Molsheim.

42083_Technic_2HY18_Front_View_01

The new model was unveiled at LEGO House at the company’s headquarters in Billund by Niels B. Christiansen, CEO of the LEGO Group, and Bugatti President Stephan Winkelmann. The 1:8 scale LEGO® Technic Bugatti Chiron will be available from June 1, only at all LEGO® stores and shop.LEGO.com, then all retailers globally from August 1, 2018. Continue reading

More Powered Up News:

In which previously known unknowns become known knowns, and a previously unknown unknown is revealed.

A quick post, following on from recent PF2.0 posts.

Currently, Fan Media are meeting in Billund (I was unable to attend this year), and the new controller and battery box have been revealed in full. Information has been gathered from our friends at HispaBrick Magazine, as well as Sariel’s LEGO®️ Workshop.

Some Previously known unknowns have been revealed:

  • The battery box requires 6 “AAA” batteries, and measures 4×8 studs x 4 bricks high
  • The controller requires 4 batteries
  • The train motor looks like the old train motor, but with the new 6 strand wire as well as the PF2.0 connector.

A new feature on the remote has been revealed: the control switches can be rotated, so that it may trigger ‘left or right’ rather than forward/ back, as seen in this image of 2 controllers, courtesy of Lluís Gibert from HispaBrick Magazine (used with permission).

Sariel’s LEGO®️Worskshop has a nice video showing the new Powered Up components, which can be found here

As the train sets are due for release shortly, we should start getting some hands on news ‘real soon now’…

In the mean time, I am preparing to go to Japan Brickfest next week, and am excited to attend my first overseas Fan event, and meet some AFOLs from around the world! I expect there may be a post or two before then….

Until next time,

Play well!